Love One Today® Research Initiative

About The Research Initiative

In 2010, HAB established a nutrition research program to increase awareness and improve understanding of the unique benefits of avocados to human health. Love One Today® is a science-based food and wellness education program that encourages Americans to include fresh Hass avocados in everyday healthy eating plans to help increase fruit and vegetable intake and as a delicious, cholesterol-free, whole food source of naturally good fats.

Research initiative overview PDF

Latest from the Love One Today® Research Initiative

Avocado consumption increases macular pigment density in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

Investigated whether consuming one fresh avocado per day could improve cognition and macular pigment density. A randomized controlled trial on 40 healthy adults, 50+ years of age: Published August 2017, Nutrients

Research Initiative

The Role of Avocados in Maternal Diets during the Periconceptional Period, Pregnancy and Lactation

What’s Inside: Maternal nutrition plays a crucial role in influencing fetal growth and birth outcomes and can also influence breast milk composition of certain nutrients. Avocados contain many of the critical nutrients for fetal and infant health and development, such as folate, potassium, carotenoids and other key compounds such as fiber, MUFA and antioxidants.

Research Initiative

A Healthy Approach to Dietary Fats: Understanding the Science and Taking Action to Reduce Consumer Confusion

What’s Inside: A significant body of research supports the unique health benefits of dietary patterns and foods that contain plant and marine sources of unsaturated fats. Nutrition Journal 2017

Research Initiative

Avocado consumption increases macular pigment density in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

What’s Inside: Investigated whether consuming one fresh avocado per day could improve cognition and macular pigment density. A randomized controlled trial on 40 healthy adults, 50+ years of age: Tufts University Published August 2017, Nutrients

Research Initiative

The Role of Avocados in Complementary & Transitional Feeding

What’s Inside: A new publication, The Role of Avocados in Complementary and Transitional Feeding, funded by the Hass Avocado Board (HAB) and published in Nutrients,1 reports that the avocado, with its smooth texture, neutral flavor and nutrient-rich profile, appears to be one of the most ideal fruits—and possibly foods—for complementary and transitional feeding.

Research Initiative

Avocados and Health of Americans

What’s Inside: A follow-up analysis from 2013 published research investigating the relationship between avocado consumption, overall diet quality, and indicators of health, based on what people actually eat in America. Published May 2017

Research Initiative

Avocados and Diet Quality

What’s Inside: Based on what people actually eat in America, investigated the relationship between avocado consumption, overall diet quality and indicators of health. Published in Nutrition Journal, January 2013. Follow-up analyses expected in 2016

Research Initiative

Avocados and Carotene Absorption

What’s Inside: Investigated if one Hass avocado can improve conversion of provitamin A to the active form of vitamin A and the absorption of carotenoids when consumed with vegetables. Published in Journal of Nutrition, August 2014. Additional analyses are underway

Research Initiative

Avocados, Blood Flow and Inflammation

What’s Inside: Published in Food and Function, November 2012. Investigated whether adding one-half of a Hass avocado to a hamburger rather than eating the burger alone could limit the production of compounds that contribute to inflammation and narrowing blood vessels.

Research Initiative

Avocados & Cholesterol Maintenance

What’s Inside: Published in The Journal of American Heart Association, January 2015. Additional analyses are underway. Investigating whether eating one Hass avocado every day for five weeks as part of a moderate fat diet has a beneficial effect on risk factors for cardiovascular disease compared to a similar diet without avocados and a low-fat diet.